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JULY IS…

Independence Day –JULY 4TH


On July 4, 1776, we claimed our independence from Britain and Democracy was born. The United States is truly a diverse nation made up of dynamic people. Each year on July 4, Americans celebrate that freedom and independence with barbecues, picnics, and family gatherings.

Most people in the United States celebrate, but do you know exactly why the holiday is so important to our country? Imagine how you would feel if someone older than you (maybe an older sister or brother) kept telling you what to do all of the time and kept taking more and more of your allowance. That is how the colonists felt in the years leading up to 1776. Great Britain kept trying to make the colonists follow more rules and pay higher taxes. People started getting mad and began making plans to be able to make their own rules. They no longer wanted Great Britain to be able to tell them what to do, so they decided to tell Great Britain that they were becoming an independent country. (To be independent means to take care of yourself, making your own rules and providing for your own needs.)

The Congress met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and they appointed a committee (a group of people working together to do a specific job) to write a formal document that would tell Great Britain that the Americans had decided to govern themselves. The committee asked Thomas Jefferson to write a draft (first try) of the document, so he worked for days, in absolute secret, until he had written a document that he thought said everything important that the committee had discussed. On June 28, 1776, the committee met to read Jefferson’s “fair” copy (he put his best ideas together and wrote them neatly.) They revised (made some changes) the document and declared their independence on July 2, 1776. They officially adopted it (made it theirs) on July 4, 1776. That is why we call it “Independence Day.” Congress ordered that all members must sign the Declaration of Independence and they all began signing the “official” copy on August 2, 1776. In January of the next year, Congress sent signed copies to all of the states.

The Declaration of Independence is more than just a piece of paper. It is a symbol of our country’s independence and commitment to certain ideas. A symbol is something that stands for something else. Most people can look at a certain little “swoosh” and know that it stands for “Nike.” Well, the signers of the Declaration of Independence wanted the citizens of the United States to have a document that spelled out what was important to our leaders and citizens. They wanted us to be able to look at the Declaration of Independence and immediately think of the goals we should always be working for, and about the people who have fought so hard to make these ideas possible. The people who signed the Declaration risked being hanged for treason by the leaders in Great Britain. They had to be very brave to sign something that would be considered a crime! So every time we look at the Declaration of Independence, we should think about all of the effort and ideas that went into the document, and about the courage it took for these people to stand up for what they knew was right — independence!

  LET US ALWAYS WORK  TOGETHER TO PRESERVE THAT WHICH  OUR FOUNDING FATHERS FOUGHT SO DILIGENTLY FOR!…

GOD BLESS AMERICA!

 

 I want to read The Declaration of Independence.

Now that you know more about the Declaration of Independence,

take this quiz to learn even more amazing facts.


Fun Facts, History & Trivia about the 4th of July

Here are some Independence Day fun facts, history and trivia.  On July the 4th, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was approved by the Continental Congress. Thereafter, the 13 colonies embarked on the road to freedom as a sovereign nation. This most American of holidays is traditionally celebrated with parades, fireworks and backyard barbecues across the country.  Take a minute to think about how much you really know about what we are celebrating.

4th of July History & Trivia -Did You Know…

  • The major objection to being ruled by Britain was taxation without representation. The colonists had no say in the decisions of English Parliament.
  • In May, 1776, after nearly a year of trying to resolve their differences with England, the colonies sent delegates to the Second Continental Congress. Finally, in June, admitting that their efforts were hopeless; a committee was formed to compose the formal Declaration of Independence. Headed by Thomas Jefferson, the committee also included John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, Philip Livingston and Roger Sherman. On June 28, 1776, Thomas Jefferson presented the first draft of the declaration to Congress.
  • Betsy Ross, according to legend, sewed the first American flag in May or June 1776, as commissioned by the Congressional Committee.
  • Independence Day was first celebrated in Philadelphia on July 8, 1776.

 

  • The Liberty Bell sounded from the tower of Independence Hall on July 8, 1776, summoning citizens to gather for the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence by Colonel John Nixon.
  • June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress, looking to promote national pride and unity, adopted the national flag. “Resolved: that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field, representing a new constellation.”
  • The word ‘patriotism’ comes from the Latin patria, which means ‘homeland’ or ‘fatherland.’
  • The first public Fourth of July event at the White House occurred in 1804.
  • Before cars ruled the roadway, the Fourth of July was tradit
    ionally the most miserable day of the year for horses, tormented by all the noise and by the boys and girls who threw firecrackers at them.
  • The first Independence Day celebration west of the Mississippi occurred at Independence Creek and was celebrated by Lewis and Clark in 1805.
  • On June 24, 1826, Thomas Jefferson sent a letter to Roger C. Weightman, declining an invitation to come to Washington, D.C., to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. It was the last letter that Jefferson, who was gravely ill, ever wrote.
  • Both Thomas Jefferson and John Adams died on Independence Day, July 4, 1826.
  • The 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence did not sign at the same time, nor did they sign on July 4, 1776. The official event occurred on August 2, 1776, when 50 men signed it.
  • The names of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were withheld from the public for more than six months to protect the signers. If independence had not been achieved, the treasonable act of the signers would have, by law, resulted in their deaths.
  • Thomas McKean was the last to sign in January, 1777.
  • The origin of Uncle Sam probably began in 1812, when Samuel Wilson was a meat packer who provided meat to the US Army. The meat shipments were stamped with the initials, U.S. Someone joked that the initials stood for “Uncle Sam”. This joke eventually led to the idea of Uncle Sam symbolizing the United States government.
  • In 1941, Congress declared 4th of July a federal legal holiday. It is one of the few federal holidays that have not been moved to the nearest Friday or Monday.
Read more on the Declaration of Independence.

Independence Day Trivia & Facts – An Inspired America:

  • Thirty places nationwide with “liberty” in their name. Liberty, Missouri (26,232) boasts the highest population of the 30 at 26,232. Iowa has more of these places than any other state at four: Libertyville, New Liberty, North Liberty and West Liberty.
  • Eleven places have “independence” in their name. The most populous of these is Independence, Missouri, with 113,288 residents.
  • Five places adopted the name “freedom.” Freedom, California, with 6,000 residents, has the largest population among these.
  • There is one place named “patriot” — Patriot, Indiana, with a population of 202.
  • And what could be more fitting than spending the day in a place called “America”? There are five such places in the country, with the most populous being American Fork, Utah, with 21,941 residents. Check out American Fact Finder.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are

Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

The Declaration of Independence 4 of July, 1776.


Fourth of July is Independence Day

Independence Day honors the birthday of the United States of America and the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. It’s a day of picnics and patriotic parades, a night of concerts and fireworks, and a reason to fly the American flag.

Related Links

  • American Holidays
    The United States celebrates many holidays—some that we share with other countries, and others that are uniquely American.

July is

Park and Recreation Month

Park and Recreation Month

Since 1985, America has celebrated July as the nation’s official Park and Recreation Month. This July we are encouraging you and your community to GET WILD about parks and recreation!

Everything from wild workouts and wellness to getting wet and wild at the pool or even wild with nature – you just can’t help but have fun this July, all while expressing the many valuable benefits of parks and recreation!

We’ve got all you need to GET WILD this July. Use the menu above to access downloadable materials, ideas on how to GET WILD, take the pledge and much more! AND you won’t want to miss the GET WILD Geocache Contest – we’ve got great prizes for participating agencies and geocache treasure hunters out there!

We know you are wild about parks and recreation so this July during Park and Recreation Month, come GET WILD with us!

READ MORE>>

Time to Celebrate National Ice Cream Month

To  kick off the annual celebration, Capitol Hill in Washington already threw its 30th annual Ice Cream Party on June 21. To beat the summer heat in Atlanta (and you KNOW it can get HOT here), why not throw your own ice cream party to celebrate National Ice Cream Month? Your kiddies will love it and you can indulge in one of summer’s favorite pastimes.

To get the party started, here are a few fun facts (from the International Ice Cream Association) about ice cream, the frozen treat that makes everyone smile, especially in the summertime.

  • Ice cream is an $11 billion retail industry.
  • America is the ice cream capital of the world, producing more than 1.5 gallons of ice cream per year.
  • Each American consumes around 22 quarts of ice cream a year.
  • Vanilla is the most popular flavor in the U.S., pulling in 20-29% of all ice cream sales.
  • Chocolate comes in a distant second, with about 9-10% of the market.
  • Children ages 2-12 and adults over 45 eat the most ice cream per person.
  • One out of every five ice cream eaters admit to binging in the middle of the night.
  • Men binge more in the middle of the night than women.
  • One out of every five ice cream eaters shares their frozen treat with their dog or cat.
  • Premium ice cream is the most popular with consumers, but it has a higher fat content than regular ice cream.
  • Ice cream sandwiches and fudge sticks are the most popular ice cream novelties.
  • Pecans are the most popular nut and strawberries are the most popular fruit added to ice cream.
  • Frozen yogurt is resurging in popularity, as is no-sugar-added ice cream.
  • About 9% of all the milk produced in the United States is used to produce ice cream.

The History of National Ice Cream Month:

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan designated July as National Ice Cream Month and the third Sunday of the month as National Ice Cream Day. He recognized ice cream as a fun and nutritious food that is enjoyed by a full 90 percent of the nation’s population. In the proclamation, President Reagan called for all people of the United States to observe these events with “appropriate ceremonies and activities.”

The International Ice Cream Association encourages retailers and consumers to celebrate each July as National Ice Cream Month. In 2012, National Ice Cream Day will be Sunday, July 15.

Ice Cream Recipes:

Ice cream is a science, especially if you try to make it yourself instead of buying it in a carton. The website ice-cream-recipes.com takes all the guesswork out of making your own ice cream and offers dozens of recipes. If you’re ready to try something new, this website offers recipes for blueberry ice cream, white wine sorbet, fresh coffee ice cream, creamy orange ice cream, green tea ice cream, apple and blackberry sorbet and more. You’ll also find great videos about ice cream, tips on buying an ice cream maker, recipes for sensational sundaes, and even directions on how to make fried ice cream. Be sure to check it out.

JULY IS..

 

On May 8, 1999 Dan Glickman, Secretary of Agriculture of the United States of America proclaimed the month of July as “National Blueberry Month”.

Spotlight on Blueberries

Blueberry Facts.
Blueberries are a native North American fruit produced in 35 States.

Fresh blueberries are available for about eight months of the year from producers across the United States and Canada. North America is the world’s leading blueberry producer. The North American harvest runs from mid-April through early October, with peak harvest in mid-May through August.

Blueberries can be found in the market all year round, along with frozen, canned and dried blueberries.

Blueberries are low in calories and sodium and are a good source of fiber.

Blueberries rank high in antioxidants that help protect against cancer, heart disease and other age-related diseases.

Researchers have found compounds in blueberries that may help prevent urinary tract infection.

How To Select and Store Blueberries

Purchasing Blueberries
When purchasing fresh blueberries, look for firm, plump, dry berries with smooth skins and a silvery sheen. Check the color – reddish berries aren’t ripe, but can be used in cooking. Avoid soft or shriveled fruit, or any signs of mold. Containers with juice stains indicate that the fruit may be bruised.

Storing Blueberries
Refrigerate fresh blueberries as soon as you get them home, in their original plastic pack or in a covered bowl or storage container. Wash berries just before use. Use within 10 days of purchase.

Freezing Blueberries
Freeze unwashed and completely dry. Discard berries that are bruised or shriveled. Blueberries can be frozen in their original plastic pack or in a resealable plastic or frozen bag or transfered to freezer container. Remember to rinse them before using.

Serving Suggestions
*Add blueberries to your favorite muffin or pancake recipe.
*Combine blueberries with yogurt and granola cereal.
*Sprinkle blueberries over mixed greens.
*Serve blueberries with sour cream, yogurt or cottage cheese.

Blueberry Smoothie 
Makes 3 Servings.1 small, ripe Banana
1 cup Frozen Blueberries
8 ounces low-fat Yogurt (Vanilla or Fruit Flavored)
3/4 cup low-fat (1%) Milk1. Peel banana, cut into 1-inch chunks. Place the banana chunks into the blender.
2. Put the frozen blueberries, yogurt and milk into the blender with the bananas.
3. Cover and blenderize on high speed for about 1 minute or until the mixture is smooth.
4. Pour smoothie into cups.
Nutrition Analysis per one serving:
Calories (kcal) 124; Dietary Fiber (g) 2.2; Fat (g) 2; Calcium (mg) 177; Sodium (mg) 75

Resources
North American Blueberry Council. NABC, The North American Blueberry Council
U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council

HAVE A HAPPY JULY!

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