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ARCHIVES: WHAT’S FOR DINNER? Our Favorite Thanksgiving Recipes!

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Our COFFEEBREAKWITHFRIENDS

favorite Thanksgiving Recipes…

Pro Tips for The Star of the Show…

THE TURKEY!

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Five Tips for a Perfect Turkey

By Kate Krader

  1. Check your instant-read or traditional meat thermometer a few days before Thanksgiving. If you place it in a pot of boiling water and it registers 212° (water’s boiling point at sea level), you’re all set. If it doesn’t, buy a new thermometer.
  2. Set the turkey on a rack in a large roasting pan to promote maximum air and heat circulation and to ensure that the bird cooks evenly.
  3. Protect the turkey breast from overcooking by roasting the bird on the lowest rack in the oven; this will keep it away from the top, the hottest part of the oven. Once the breast skin is browned, loosely cover it with foil to prevent it from becoming too dark.
  4. Keep a careful eye on the thermometer during the last half hour of cooking since the turkey’s temperature may rise rapidly toward the end.
  5. Check for doneness in the thickest, meatiest parts of the turkey. Using your thermometer, test the widest section of the breast near the wing joint; the temperature should be 165°. Test the legs at the top of the thigh, near the hip joint; the temperature should be 180°. Insert the instant-read thermometer deep enough to reach its heat sensor, the indentation about two inches from the tip. Also check the juices. If they have a pinkish tinge, continue roasting; if they’re clear, the turkey’s done. Try to insert the thermometer as infrequently as possible, to prevent the precious juices from escaping.

OUR FAVORITE TURKEY

Recipe:

Cider-Glazed Turkey with Lager Gravy

  • STAFF-FAVORITE

TURKEY

  1. One 12- to 13-pound turkey—neck and giblets reserved, wing tips cut off and reserved
  2. 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  3. 1 unpeeled head of garlic, halved crosswise
  4. 1 jalapeño, halved
  5. 1 Granny Smith apple, quartered
  6. 12 sage leaves
  7. 1/3 cup apple cider
  8. 1 stick unsalted butter

GRAVY

  1. 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  2. Reserved turkey neck, wing tips and giblets
  3. Salt and freshly ground pepper
  4. 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  5. 1/2 cup apple cider
  6. One 12-ounce bottle lager
  7. 1 bay leaf
  1. PREPARE THE TURKEY Season the turkey inside and out with the kosher salt. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  2. Uncover the turkey and let it return to room temperature. Stuff the cavity with the garlic, jalapeño, apple and 6 of the sage leaves. Transfer the turkey to a large roasting pan.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350°. In a small saucepan, combine the cider with the butter and the remaining 6 sage leaves and cook over low heat until the butter has melted and the sage is fragrant, about 4 minutes. Dampen a 32-by-20-inch piece of cheesecloth with water and squeeze dry. Immerse the cheesecloth in the cider butter until the liquid is absorbed. Drape the soaked cheesecloth over the turkey breast and legs.
  4. Roast the turkey for 30 minutes. Add 2 cups of water to the roasting pan and continue to roast for about 2 hours longer, rotating the pan a few times, until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the inner thigh registers 165°.
  5. MEANWHILE, PREPARE THE GRAVY In a large saucepan, heat the vegetable oil. Add the turkey neck, wing tips and giblets, except for the liver, and season with salt and pepper. Cook over moderate heat, turning a few times, until nicely browned, about 12 minutes. Remove the turkey parts and reserve. Off the heat, stir the flour into the fat in the saucepan to make a paste. Gradually whisk in the cider until smooth, then whisk in the lager. Add 3 cups of water and bring to a boil over moderately high heat, whisking until thickened. Return the turkey parts to the saucepan and add the bay leaf. Cover and cook over low heat, whisking occasionally, until the gravy is flavorful, about 1 1/2 hours. Discard the turkey parts and bay leaf.
  6. Carefully peel the cheesecloth off the turkey and discard. Transfer the turkey to a cutting board and let rest for 30 minutes. Pour the pan juices into a glass measuring cup and skim the fat. Add the pan juices to the gravy and bring to a simmer over moderate heat. Season the reserved liver with salt and pepper, add to the gravy and simmer until pink in the center, about 5 minutes. Remove the liver and cut it into small pieces.
  7. In a blender, puree the liver with 1 cup of the gravy. Whisk the liver puree into the gravy and season with salt and pepper. Rewarm the gravy if necessary. Carve the turkey and serve with the gravy.

Roasting the Turkey

When selecting a turkey, buy a fresh one if possible. Allow about one pound of uncooked bird per person—more if you want leftovers.

  • Make turkey stock with the neck and giblets.
  • Remove the turkey from the refrigerator one to two hours before roasting.
  • Preheat the oven to 425°. Rinse the turkey inside and out with cold water. Dry with paper towels. Lightly season the turkey, inside and out, with salt and pepper.
  • Spoon the stuffing loosely into the chest cavity and the smaller neck cavity. Cover the stuffed neck area with the skin flap; if you wish, sew or skewer it shut and do the same to the chest cavity. Truss the bird with twine by tying the legs together, then bring the string around to the neck and tie it, securing the wings to the body.
  • Place the turkey, breast side up, on a greased rack in a shallow roasting pan just large enough to hold it.
  • In a medium saucepan, melt one stick of butter. Dampen and wring out a 14-by-24-inch piece of cheesecloth. Soak it in the butter until the cloth is evenly coated and all the butter has been absorbed. Double the cheesecloth and drape it over the turkey breast (this ensures a moist, not overcooked breast).
  • Put the turkey in the oven and immediately reduce the heat to 325°. Roast the bird for about 20 minutes per pound for a stuffed bird and 16 minutes per pound for an unstuffed one. Using a large bulb baster, baste the turkey through the cheesecloth with the pan drippings every 30 minutes. About 45 minutes before the turkey is finished, remove the cheesecloth. Continue to roast, basting every 15 minutes, until the bird is browned, the juices in the inner thigh run clear when pricked and an instant-read thermometer thrust into the thickest part of the thigh (without touching the bone) registers between 160° and 180° (the USDA specifies that cooking poultry to an internal temperature of 180° will kill all bacteria that can cause illness).
  • Transfer the turkey to a carving board, cover loosely with foil and let rest for at least 15 and up to 30 minutes before carving (see Making the Gravy).

AND DON’T FORGET THOSE GREAT SIDE DISHES!

STAR CHEF SUGGESTIONS…

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Arugula-Orange Salad with Pomegranate-White Wine Vinaigrette

Perfect for holiday entertaining, this salad features the traditional colors of Christmas. It also allows you to make good use of your fancy vinegars. Champagne vinegar, fruit-flavored vinegar or white wine vinegar will work with the sweet and tart taste of the pomegranate and oranges.

Ingredients:

For the vinaigrette:

  • 1 pomegranate
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 Tbs. white wine vinegar or raspberry vinegar
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 large navel oranges
  • 3 bunches arugula, tough stems removed
  • 1 small red onion, sliced crosswise into thin rings

Directions:

To make the vinaigrette, carefully remove the skin from the pomegranate. Working over a sieve placed over a bowl to catch the juices, peel away the thick membrane from the pomegranate seeds and allow the loosened seeds to collect in the sieve. Measure 1/3 cup of the seeds and reserve for garnish. Press on the remaining seeds with the back of a spoon to release about 2 Tbs. juice. Discard the crushed seeds.Add the olive oil, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper to the pomegranate juice. Whisk until blended.Using a small, sharp knife, cut a slice off the top and bottom of each orange to expose the flesh. Place each orange upright on a cutting board and thickly slice off the peel in strips, following the contour of the orange to expose the flesh. Holding the orange over a large bowl, cut along either side of each section, letting the section drop into the bowl. Add the arugula and red onion, separating the onion slices into rings. Drizzle the dressing over the salad, then toss to coat evenly.

Divide the salad among individual plates, distributing the orange sections evenly. Garnish with the reserved pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately.

Serves 6.
Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Lifestyles Series, Holiday Celebrations, by Marie Simmons (Time-Life Books, 1998).

Recipe:

Pan-Roasted Sweet Potatoes with Fennel

  • HEALTHY
  • MAKE-AHEAD
  • VEGETARIAN
  1. 4 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1 1/2-inch chunks
  2. 4 fennel bulbs, halved lengthwise and cut into 3/4-inch wedges, some of the feathery tops finely chopped
  3. 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  4. 1 tablespoon light brown sugar
  5. 1/4 teaspoon ground mace
  6. Salt and freshly ground pepper
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°. In a bowl, toss the sweet potato chunks and fennel wedges with the olive oil, brown sugar and mace; season with salt and pepper.
  2. Spread the vegetables in a large nonstick roasting pan. Roast for about 1 hour, stirring occasionally, until the sweet potatoes and fennel are tender and caramelized. Transfer them to a platter, sprinkle with the fennel tops and serve.
MAKE AHEAD The roasted vegetables can be refrigerated overnight. Reheat in a 400° oven before serving. NOTES One Serving Calories 211 kcal, Total Fat 6.2 gm, Saturated Fat 1 gm.

Recipe:

Chantilly Potatoes with a Parmesan Crust

  • STAFF-FAVORITE
  • VEGETARIAN
  1. 2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into 2-inch chunks
  2. Salt
  3. 1/2 cup cold milk
  4. 7 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened
  5. Freshly ground pepper
  6. 1 cup heavy cream
  7. 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  1. Preheat the oven to 400°. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Put the potatoes in a large saucepan and cover with water. Salt the water and bring to a boil, then simmer the potatoes over moderate heat until tender, about 12 minutes. Drain the potatoes, return to the saucepan and shake over high heat for 1 minute to dry. Pass the potatoes through a ricer into a large bowl. Beat in the milk and 6 tablespoons of the butter and season with salt and pepper.
  2. In a large stainless steel bowl, whip the cream to soft peaks. Beat one-third of the cream into the potatoes, then fold in the remaining cream. Scrape the potatoes into the prepared dish. Dot with the remaining 1 tablespoon of butter and sprinkle the Parmesan over the top. Bake the potatoes for 25 minutes. Preheat the broiler and broil the potatoes for 2 minutes, or until browned. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

Recipe:

Scalloped Potatoes with Ham

  • MAKE-AHEAD
  1. 3 cups heavy cream
  2. 1 garlic clove, finely grated
  3. Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  4. Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  5. 2 1/2 pounds baking potatoes, peeled
  6. 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  7. 1/2 cup freshly grated pecorino cheese
  8. 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  9. 6 ounces baked ham, sliced 1/4 inch thick and cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  1. Preheat the oven to 400° and butter a shallow 9-by-13-inch baking dish. In a medium saucepan, bring the heavy cream to a simmer. Add the garlic and nutmeg and season with salt and pepper. Keep warm.
  2. Using a mandoline, slice the potatoes crosswise 1/8 inch thick. In a small bowl, combine the pecorino and Parmigiano cheese. Arrange one fourth of the potato slices in the prepared baking dish, overlapping them slightly. Sprinkle 1/4 cup of the cheese, 1 tablespoon of the parsley and one third of the ham over the potatoes. Repeat the layering two more times. Top with a final layer of potatoes and sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 cup of cheese. Pour the cream mixture over and around the potatoes.
  3. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, until the potatoes are tender and bubbling and the top is golden brown. Let stand for 15 minutes. Sprinkle with the remaining 1 tablespoon of parsley and serve.
MAKE AHEAD The unbaked gratin can be refrigerated overnight. Return to room temperature before baking.

Chestnut and Cranberry Dressing

Cranberries neednt be relegated only to the relish that accompanies the Thanksgiving feast. Here, tangy dried cranberries are combined with a traditional chestnut dressing that is also delicious served alongside roast pork.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups unsalted chicken stock
  • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 4 Tbs. (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 1 celery stalk, chopped
  • 1 carrot, peeled and chopped
  • 1/2 lb. bulk pork sausage
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1-lb. loaf country-style bread, crusts removed,
    cut into 1/2-inch pieces, toasted
  • 2 cups prepared French chestnuts, halved
  • 2 Tbs. chopped fresh sage
  • 1 tsp. chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Directions:

Preheat an oven to 350°F. Butter a 2 1/4 to 3-quart baking dish.

In a small saucepan over medium heat, warm the stock until steam starts to rise, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the dried cranberries. Set aside.

In a large fry pan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion, celery and carrot and sauté, stirring occasionally, until tender and translucent, 2 to 3 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a bowl.

In the same pan, sauté the sausage, stirring and crumbling with a fork, until lightly browned and cooked through, about 10 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the sausage to the bowl with the vegetables.

In a large bowl, stir the egg while slowly pouring in the stock and cranberries. Add the bread and toss until well blended. Let stand, stirring occasionally, until the stock is absorbed, 6 to 8 minutes. Add the vegetable-sausage mixture, the chestnuts, sage, thyme and parsley. Season with salt and pepper and stir to mix. Transfer to the prepared baking dish. Bake until the dressing is browned and crispy, 45 to 50 minutes. Serves 10 to 12.

Williams-Sonoma Kitchen.

Green Beans with Sweet-and-Sour Bacon Dressing

Sweet, salty and sour flavors mingle irresistibly in this simple yet bold-flavored dish of green beans dressed in a bacon vinaigrette. Chef Sarah Johannes says these beans, inspired by her grandmother’s recipe, are famous in her family and are a staple at her holiday gatherings in the Midwest. They make a festive addition to a Thanksgiving spread and would be delicious for summer picnics, as well.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 lb. thick-cut bacon, cut crosswise into 1/8-inch strips
  • 1/2 yellow onion, finely minced
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 3 lb. green beans, trimmed

Directions:

In a large Dutch oven over medium heat, cook the bacon until browned and crispy, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate. Reserve 2 Tbs. of the bacon fat in the pan. Pour the remaining fat into a heatproof container and set aside.

Return the pot to medium heat, add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the vinegar and, using a wooden spoon, scrape up the browned bits from the pan bottom. Stir in the sugar, bring to a simmer and cook until the mixture is reduced by half, about 10 minutes.

Add the stock and half of the bacon. Simmer over medium heat until the liquid is slightly reduced, about 5 minutes. Add the reserved bacon fat and season with salt and pepper.

Add the green beans and bring to a simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally to coat them with the dressing. Cook until the beans are crisp-tender, about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and let the beans stand in the dressing for at least 30 minutes or up to 1 hour, stirring occasionally to coat them with the dressing.

Transfer the beans to a serving bowl and top with the remaining bacon. Serve immediately. Serves 12.

Adapted from a recipe by Sara Johannes, WP24, Los Angeles.

Perfect for holiday entertaining, this salad features the traditional colors of Christmas. It also allows you to make good use of your fancy vinegars. Champagne vinegar, fruit-flavored vinegar or white wine vinegar will work with the sweet and tart taste of the pomegranate and oranges.

Ingredients:

For the vinaigrette:

  • 1 pomegranate
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 Tbs. white wine vinegar or raspberry vinegar
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • Freshly ground pepper, to taste
  • 2 large navel oranges
  • 3 bunches arugula, tough stems removed
  • 1 small red onion, sliced crosswise into thin rings

Directions:

To make the vinaigrette, carefully remove the skin from the pomegranate. Working over a sieve placed over a bowl to catch the juices, peel away the thick membrane from the pomegranate seeds and allow the loosened seeds to collect in the sieve. Measure 1/3 cup of the seeds and reserve for garnish. Press on the remaining seeds with the back of a spoon to release about 2 Tbs. juice. Discard the crushed seeds.Add the olive oil, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper to the pomegranate juice. Whisk until blended.

Using a small, sharp knife, cut a slice off the top and bottom of each orange to expose the flesh. Place each orange upright on a cutting board and thickly slice off the peel in strips, following the contour of the orange to expose the flesh. Holding the orange over a large bowl, cut along either side of each section, letting the section drop into the bowl. Add the arugula and red onion, separating the onion slices into rings. Drizzle the dressing over the salad, then toss to coat evenly.

Divide the salad among individual plates, distributing the orange sections evenly. Garnish with the reserved pomegranate seeds. Serve immediately.

Serves 6.
Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Lifestyles Series, Holiday Celebrations, by Marie Simmons (Time-Life Books, 1998).

Jellied Cranberry Sauce with Fuji Apple

  • TOTAL TIME: 20 MIN PLUS 3 HR CHILLING
  • SERVINGS: 12
 Cranberries only need to be cooked for a few minutes before they burst and form a sauce. Melissa Rubel Jacobson has a number of recipes for them, including Cranberry, Clementine and Pumpkin Seed Conserve and Cranberry-and-Dried-Fruit Compote. To mold the sauce so it’s sliceable, she adds an apple, which is loaded with pectin, a natural gelling agent.

Recipe: Jellied Cranberry Sauce with Fuji Apple

  • HEALTHY
  • MAKE-AHEAD
  • VEGETARIAN
  1. One 12-ounce bag fresh cranberries
  2. 1 large Fuji apple, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  3. 1 cup sugar
  4. 3/4 cup water
  1. Line an 8-by-4-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap and spray the plastic wrap with nonstick cooking spray.
  2. In a medium saucepan, combine the cranberries with the apple, sugar and water. Bring to a boil and cook over moderately high heat, stirring frequently until the cranberries are completely broken down and the sauce is very thick, about 15 minutes. Scrape the cranberry sauce into the prepared pan and refrigerate until chilled, about 3 hours. Invert the jelly onto a serving plate and remove the plastic wrap. Garnish with fresh cranberries and rosemary sprigs. Slice with a serrated knife before serving.
MAKE AHEAD The cranberry sauce can be covered in plastic wrap and refrigerated for up to 2 weeks. Serve chilled. NOTES Leftover cranberry sauce is always great as a spread on sandwiches. For a more creative use, try the Brown Butter Custard Pie with Cranberry Glaze, a recipe by Christina Tosi, the pastry chef at New York City’s Momofuku.

 

…And let’s not forget DESERT!

Sweet Potato Pie with Pecan Streusel

Sweet potatoes are the edible roots of a plant in the morning glory family. Some have tan skin and pale yellow flesh and a dry, fluffy texture when cooked, similar to that of a regular potato. Others have dark reddish or purplish skin and deep orange flesh and a soft, moist texture when cooked. The latter are sweeter and are known in the United States as yams, although they are not true yams, which belong to a different species and are rarely available in the United States. Both types of sweet potatoes can be used for this recipe, although the yam, particularly the Garnet yam, is preferred.

Ingredients:

  • 1 rolled-out basic pie dough round (see  below)
  • or use pre-prepared pie -dough

For the pecan streusel:

  • 1 Tbs. firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup pecans, coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon

For the filling:

  • 1 large Garnet yam (orange-fleshed sweet
    potato), 12 to 14 oz.
  • 3/4 cup firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tsp. ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. ground ginger
  • 1/4 tsp. ground allspice
  • 1 1/4 cups heavy cream
  • Sweetened whipped cream for serving

Directions:

Fold the dough round in half and transfer to a 9-inch pie dish. Unfold and ease into the pan, patting it firmly into the bottom and up the sides. Using kitchen shears, trim the edge of the dough round, leaving 3/4 inch of overhang. Fold the overhang under itself and pinch it together to create a high edge on the pans rim. Flute the edge decoratively.Refrigerate or freeze the pie shell until firm, about 30 minutes. Meanwhile, position a rack in the lower third of an oven and preheat to 375°F.

Line the pastry shell with aluminum foil or parchment paper and fill with pie weights or raw short-grain rice. Bake for 20 minutes, then lift an edge of the foil. If the dough looks wet, continue to bake, checking every 5 minutes, until the dough is pale gold, for a total baking time of 25 to 30 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack. Reduce the oven temperature to 350°F.

To make the pecan streusel, in a small bowl, stir together the brown sugar, pecans and cinnamon. Set aside.

To make the filling, prick the yam several times with a fork, put directly on the oven rack and bake until tender when pierced with a knife, about 55 minutes. Alternatively, cook the yam in the microwave on high heat until tender, about 6 minutes per side. Set aside to cool. Peel the cooled yam and mash the pulp with a fork or puree in a food processor until smooth. Measure out 1 cup of the puree for the filling. (Reserve any remaining yam for another use.)

In a large bowl, stir together the brown sugar, salt and eggs. Add the cinnamon, ginger and allspice and mix well. Stir in the yam puree and cream and beat until smooth. Pour into the partially baked pie shell.

Bake until the filling is firm, about 20 minutes. Remove the pie from the oven, quickly sprinkle the pecan streusel evenly over the surface, and continue baking until the filling is slightly risen and firm in the middle, 20 to 25 minutes more. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool.

Slice the pie into wedges and serve with whipped cream. Makes one 9-inch pie; serves 8.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Collection Series, Pie & Tart, by Carolyn Beth Weil (Simon & Schuster, 2003).

Basic Pie Dough

  • 1 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tbs. sugar
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 8 Tbs. (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • 3 Tbs. very cold water

Directions:

To make the dough by hand, in a large bowl, stir together the flour, sugar and salt. Using a pastry cutter or 2 knives, cut the butter into the flour mixture until the texture resembles coarse cornmeal, with butter pieces no larger than small peas. Add the water and mix with a fork just until the dough pulls together.

To make the dough in a stand mixer, fit the mixer with the flat beater, and stir together the flour, sugar and salt in the mixer bowl. Add the butter and toss with a fork to coat with the flour mixture. Mix on medium-low speed until the texture resembles coarse cornmeal, with the butter pieces no larger than small peas. Add the water and mix on low speed just until the dough pulls together.

Transfer the dough to a work surface, pat into a ball and flatten into a disk. (Although many dough recipes call for chilling the dough at this point, this dough should be rolled out immediately for the best results.) Lightly flour the work surface, then flatten the disk with 6 to 8 gentle taps of the rolling pin. Lift the dough and give it a quarter turn. Lightly dust the top of the dough or the rolling pin with flour as needed, then roll out into a round at least 12 inches in diameter and about 1/8 inch thick. Makes enough dough for one 9-inch single-crust pie or one 10-inch galette.

To make a double-crust pie: Double the recipe, cut the dough in half and pat each half into a round, flat disk. Roll out one disk into a 12-inch round as directed and line the pan or dish. Press any scraps trimmed from the first round into the bottom of the second disk. Roll out the second dough disk into a round at least 12 inches in diameter and about 1/8 inch thick and refrigerate until ready to use.

To make a lattice top: Double the recipe, cut the dough in half and pat one half into a round, flat disk. Roll out the disk into a 12-inch round as directed and line the pan or dish. Trim the edge of the dough, leaving a 1/2-inch overhang. Press any scraps trimmed from the first round into the bottom of the remaining dough half. Pat the dough into a rectangle and roll out into a rectangular shape about 1/8 inch thick. Trim to cut out a 14-by-11-inch rectangle and refrigerate until ready to use.

Nut Dough Variation: Add 2 Tbs. ground toasted pecans, walnuts, almonds or hazelnuts to the flour mixture and proceed as directed.

Make-Ahead Tip: Pie dough may be made ahead and frozen for up to 2 months. To freeze, place the dough round on a 12-inch cardboard circle and wrap it well with plastic wrap. Alternatively, use the round to line a pie pan or dish, flute the edge and wrap well.

Adapted from Williams-Sonoma Collection Series, Pie & Tart, by Carolyn Beth Weil (Simon & Schuster, 2003).

Top 20 Pumpkin Pie Recipes

Find a new favorite recipe for pumpkin pie, whether you’re making it from scratch or taking a few shortcuts.

More Pumpkin Pie Advice

We’ll help you make that flaky crust and creamy, spicy filling with these tips

FOR MORE THANKSGIVING RECIPES AND COOKWARE VISIT>>

WE HOPE YOU HAVE A HAPPY AND HEALTHY

AND BLESSED THANKSGIVING!