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SEPTEMBER IS…

Why We Remember?


It has been 11 years since the day that left America in complete devastation, despair and confusion.

The effects of that tragedy are still so real, the wounds are still so fresh,

but it is important to take time to remember and honor those that lost their lives and

take solace in the promises of God in times of tragedy. He will never leave nor forsake us.

He is faithful even in our darkest hours.

“IF GOD BE FOR US WHO CAN BE AGAINST US?”

 

September is

National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) (www.recoverymonth.gov) is a national observance that educates Americans on the fact that addiction treatment and mental health services can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. The observance’s main focus is to laud the gains made by those in recovery from these conditions, just as we would those who are managing other health conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease.Recovery Month spreads the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover.

Recovery Month , now in its 23rd year, highlights individuals who have reclaimed their lives and are living happy and healthy lives in long-term recovery and also honors the prevention, treatment, and recovery service providers who make recovery possible. Recovery Month promotes the message that recovery in all its forms is possible, and also encourages citizens to take action to help expand and improve the availability of effective prevention, treatment, and recovery services for those in need.

Celebrated during the month of September, Recovery Month began in 1989 as TreatmentWorks! Month, which honored the work of the treatment and recovery professionals in the field. The observance evolved to National Alcohol and Drug Addiction Recovery Month (Recovery Month) in 1998, when the observance expanded to include celebrating the accomplishment of individuals in recovery from substance use disorders. The observance evolved once again in 2011 to National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) to include all aspects of behavioral health.

Each September, thousands of prevention, treatment, and recovery programs and services around the country celebrate their successes and share them with their neighbors, friends, and colleagues in an effort to educate the public about recovery, how it works, for whom, and why. There are millions of Americans whose lives have been transformed through recovery. These successes often go unnoticed by the broader population; therefore, Recovery Month provides a vehicle to celebrate these accomplishments.

The 2012 Recovery Month observance emphasizes that while the road to recovery may be difficult, the benefits of preventing and overcoming behavioral health conditions are significant and valuable to individuals, families, and communities. Recovery Month, officially celebrated each September, has become a year-round initiative that supports educational outreach and celebratory events throughout the year.

Currently, 140 Federal, State and local government entities, as well as non-profit organizations and associations affiliated with prevention, treatment, and recovery of mental and substance use disorders, comprise the Recovery Month Planning Partners’ group. The Planning Partners assist in the development, dissemination and collaboration of materials, promotion and event sponsorship for theRecovery Month initiative.

Materials produced for the Recovery Month observance include print, web, television, radio and social media tools. These resources help local communities reach out and encourage individuals in need of services, and their friends and families, to seek treatment and recovery services and information. Materials provide multiple resources including SAMHSA’s National Helpline – 1-800-662 HELP (4357) for information and treatment referral and SAMHSA’s Treatment information at http://www.samhsa.gov/.

Teenage Marijuana Use May Hurt Future IQ

(8/28/2012)

Teenage Marijuana Use May Hurt Future IQ
ABC News

August 27, 2012

In a study of more than 1,000 adolescents in New Zealand, those who began habitually smoking marijuana before age 18 showed an eight-point drop in IQ between the ages of 13 and 38, a considerable decline.

Madeline Meier, lead researcher and a post-doctoral associate at Duke University, said that persistent use of marijuana in adolescence appeared to blunt intelligence, attention and memory. More persistent marijuana use was associated with greater cognitive decline.

Of particular worry is the permanence of these effects among people who began smoking marijuana in adolescence. Even after these subjects stopped using marijuana for a year, its adverse effects persisted and some neurological deficits remained. People who did not engage in marijuana smoking until after adolescence showed no adverse effects on intelligence.

View the full article here: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2012/08/27/teenage-marijuana-use-may-hurt-future-iq/

Survey:

“Digital peer pressure”

Fueling drug, alcohol use in high school students

(8/28/2012)

Survey: “Digital peer pressure” fueling drug, alcohol use in high school students
CBS News

August 22, 2012

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASAColumbia) reported that 17 percent of high school students – about 2.8 million U.S. teens – drink, drug and smoke during the school day.

“This year’s survey reveals a new kind of potent peer pressure – digital peer pressure,” Califano said. “Digital peer pressure moves beyond a child’s friends and the kids they hang out with. It invades the home and a child’s bedroom via the Internet,” he said.

Last year’s survey from CASAColumbia found similar rates among teens exposed to questionable images through social media.

View the full article here: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57498147-10391704/survey-digital-peer-pressure-fueling-drug-alcohol-use-in-high-school-students/

 

Students fight addiction at ‘Recovery High’

By Yardena Schwartz
NBC News 

Alyssa Dedrick was 15 when she began drinking and taking drugs. A year later, she found herself in her first treatment center. It wasn’t voluntary, and she missed hanging out with her friends, who were still experimenting with pot, OxyContin, Percocet and heroin. But her first treatment program didn’t work, because as soon as Dedrick went back to school, she went right back to her old ways. She received treatment four more times, with the same results.

Finally, she and her mother realized that the answer to her seemingly unstoppable problem was not the treatment she received, but where she went when it was over. After her fifth treatment program at the end of her junior year, Dedrick truly wanted to recover. This time, she and her mother decided, she wouldn’t go back to her old high school. Rather than facing the same temptations and triggers, surrounded by friends who weren’t committed to recovery, Dedrick started her senior year at Northshore Recovery High School. It was minutes away from her old high school in Massachusetts, but may as well have been on a different planet.

“I remember going in and thinking, ‘This is a place full of other kids just like me,’” said Dedrick, now 24 and a recent graduate of Clark University.  Dedrick has been clean for five years now, and believes her life would be very different  if she hadn’t finished high school at Northshore Recovery.

“There was a 50/50 chance of me either dying or getting better,” said Dedrick. “I think going to a recovery school really increased my odds, not only of recovery, but of survival in general.”

Recovery high schools on the rise

While teen drug use is nothing new, the proliferation of high schools designed for students in recovery is something of a 21st century phenomenon. The first recovery high school in the United States opened its doors in Minnesota in 1987, calling itself “Sobriety High.” Until recently, it was one of a handful sprinkled around the country. Today it is joined by at least 35 recovery high schools across the nation, with at least five more in development, Association of Recovery Schools founder Andrew Finch told NBC News.

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, close to two million American students meet the criteria for drug or alcohol abuse. Yet less than eight percent of them receive the treatment they need. Those who do get treatment typically return to the schools they left in order to recover, and 75 percent of them relapse within their first year after treatment.

 READ MORE>>

 

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Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

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Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

For more on the Association of Recovery Schools, please visit their website.

And for additional information about college recovery programs, please visit the links below.

Related coverage from ‘Nightly News’

About Recovery Month      Sitemap Contact              Recovery Month

National Cholesterol Education Month

September is

National Cholesterol Education Month,  a good time to get your blood cholesterol checked and take steps to lower it if it is high. National Cholesterol Education Month is also a good time to learn about lipid profiles and about food and lifestyle choices that help you reach personal cholesterol goals.

High blood cholesterol affects over 65 million Americans. It is a serious condition that increases your risk for heart disease. The higher your cholesterol level,

the greater the risk. You can have high cholesterol and not know it. Lowering cholesterol levels that are too high lessens your risk for developing heart disease

and reduces the chance of having a heart attack or dying of heart disease.

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The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

offers helpful resources

to use during National Cholesterol Education Month.

For Individuals

Get these public education booklets for yourself and

share them with family and friends.

For Persons with High Blood Cholesterol Who Need to Lower It

Heart Healthy Recipes

FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK  BELOW:

 

September Is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

Carey M. Herrington
Outreach Coordinator, South Florida- Broward County
(954)562-5578  www.facingourrisk.org

StartTheConversation

My motivation for opening this zazzle store was to spread awareness about hereditary breast and ovarian cancer…start the conversation. Wearing a unique shirt or necklace or mailing a special greeting card and stamp can generate curiousity & questions from those who see them. Ultimately, it starts the conversation…ALL of the monies earned on purchases from this StartTheConversation zazzle store will go directly to FORCE.FORCE is a non-profit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of individuals and families affected by hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. 10% of all breast cancers are genetically based. If you carry a genetic mutation, your odds of getting breast cancer in your lifetime can be as high as 87%–your odds of getting ovarian cancer in your lifetime, can be as high as 50%. FORCE provides advocacy, support, education, and research specific to hereditary cancer. For all up-to-date and accurate information on hereditary cancer, please visit FORCE www.facingourrisk.org

The next annual FORCE conference will be held in Orlando October 18-20 2012.

If you are a FORCE outreach coordinator and would like to have a fundraiser utilizing StartTheConversation products, please email me for information about discounts on bulk orders. amys@facingourrisk.org

Please pass on this store link:
www.zazzle.com/StartTheConversation* 

Thank you!
Amy

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How to Help

Please invest in a future free of the ravages of hereditary cancer by supporting the research fund.

Donate Now

denim patch for 100 donation

Donate now by credit card or send your check or money order to:

FORCE: Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered
16057 Tampa Palms Blvd. W, PMB #373
Tampa, FL 33647

Read Sue Friedman’s blog for her perspective on why we need a hereditary cancer research fund.

Help us advance hereditary cancer research bycompleting our short survey, and making a financial contribution to help us realize our goal.

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Quick Links

How Ovarian Cancer Develops

Watch a medical animation that illustrates how ovarian cancer develops in a woman’s body. Learn about the ovaries and how a tumor develops, as well as ovarian cancer symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.

 

September is TEAL

Thousands Wear TEAL Across the USA
September marks the nationwide observance of National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.

The first Friday in September is National Wear TEAL Day, and the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance

will lead the efforts of thousands of Americans wearing TEAL to increase awareness about the deadly disease.

TEAL is the ovarian cancer community’s color and serves as a reminder that ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all the cancers

of the reproductive system and a leading cause of cancer death among women.

To find out what you can do this September to get involved, visit our September guide.

The United States of Teal campaign
United States of Teal is the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance’s campaign to raise awareness about ovarian cancer by gaining the support of state legislative leadership.

With our United States of Teal campaign we’re targeting all 50 state houses and asking legislators to pledge their allegiance to the fight against ovarian cancer. By signing a pledge card, they are letting their constituents know that they are committed to promoting ovarian cancer research, improving the lives of women suffering from ovarian cancer, and helping us raise awareness about ovarian cancer symptoms. Once a legislator pledges, we’ll turn his/her state teal on the United States of Teal web site (www.unitedstatesofteal.org). See the map below to see if your state has turned TEALyet!

To learn more about the campaign, visit www.unitedstatesofteal.org.

What’s New?
Our Shop+Give Program
Some of our favortite retailers have teamed up with the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance this September.

A portion of the proceeds of selected TEAL items from the following retailers will benefit the work of OCNA:

Macy’s, Chico’s, Ann Taylor Loft, PaperSource, RedEnvelope, DHC, Sketchers and Tom Shoes.

Click here to shop TEAL items from your favorite retailer! And Don’t forget to download the App for future online purchases.

Ovarian cancer is a growth of abnormal malignant cells that begins in the ovaries (women’s reproductive glands that produce ova).

Cancer that spreads to the ovaries but originates at another site is not considered ovarian cancer. 

Ovarian tumors can be benign (noncancerous)

or malignant (cancerous). Although abnormal, cells of benign tumors do not metastasize (spread to other parts of the body).

Malignant cancer cells in the ovaries can metastasize in two ways:  directly to other organs in the pelvis and abdomen (the more common way),

through the bloodstream or lymph nodes to other parts of the body.

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff

Living with cancer newsletter

Subscribe to our Living with cancernewsletter to stay up to date on cancer topics.

Symptoms of ovarian cancer are not specific to the disease, and they often

mimic those of many other more-common conditions,

including digestive and bladder problems.

When ovarian cancer symptoms are present, they tend to be persistent and worsen with time.

Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer may include:

  • Abdominal pressure, fullness, swelling or bloating
  • Pelvic discomfort or pain
  • Persistent indigestion, gas or nausea
  • Changes in bowel habits, such as constipation
  • Changes in bladder habits, including a frequent need to urinate
  • Loss of appetite or quickly feeling full
  • Increased abdominal girth or clothes fitting tighter around your waist
  • A persistent lack of energy
  • Low back pain

While the causes of ovarian cancer are unknown, some theories exist:

Genetic errors may occur because of damage from the normal monthly release of an egg.

Increased hormone levels before and during ovulation may stimulate the growth of abnormal cells.

 

Types of Ovarian Cancer

Different types of ovarian cancer are classified according to the type of cell from which they start.

Epithelial tumors – About 90 percent of ovarian cancers develop in the epithelium, the thin layer of tissue that covers the ovaries.

This form of ovarian cancer generally occurs in postmenopausal women.

Germ cell carcinoma tumors –Making up about five percent of ovarian cancer cases, this type begins in the cells that form eggs.

While germ cell carcinoma can occur in women of any age, it tends to be found most often in women in their early 20s. Six main kinds of germ cell carcinoma exist,

but the three most common types are: teratomas, dysgerminomas, and endodermal sinus tumors. Many tumors that arise in the germ cells are benign.

Stromal carcinoma tumors – Ovarian stromal carcinoma accounts for about five percent of ovarian cancer cases. It develops in the connective

tissue cells that hold the ovary together and those that produce the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. The two most common types are

granulosa cell tumors and sertoli-leydig cell tumors. Unlike with epithelial ovarian carcinoma,

70 percent of stromal carcinoma cases are diagnosed in Stage I. READ MORE>>

 

Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic staff

Living with cancer newsletter

Treatment of ovarian cancer usually involves a combination of surgery and chemotherapy.

Surgery
Treatment for ovarian cancer usually involves an extensive operation that includes removing both ovaries, fallopian tubes, and the uterus as

well as nearby lymph nodes and a fold of fatty abdominal tissue known as the omentum, where ovarian cancer often spreads. Your surgeon also removes

as much cancer as possible from your abdomen (surgical debulking).

Less extensive surgery may be possible if your ovarian cancer was diagnosed at a very early stage. For women with stage I ovarian cancer, surgery may involve

removing one ovary and its fallopian tube. This procedure may preserve the ability to have children in the future.

Chemotherapy
After surgery, you’ll most likely be treated with chemotherapy — drugs designed to kill any remaining cancer cells. Chemotherapy may also be

used as the initial treatment in some women with advanced ovarian cancer. Chemotherapy drugs can be administered in a vein (intravenously) or injected

directly into the abdominal cavity, or both methods of administering the drugs can be used. Chemotherapy drugs can be given alone or in combination..FOR MORE INFORMATION>>

 

Basic Information About Gynecologic Cancers

Five main types of cancer affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. As a group, they are referred to as gynecologic cancer. (A sixth type of gynecologic cancer is the very rare fallopian tube cancer.)

In 2008 (the most recent year numbers are available)—

  • 83,662 women in the United States were diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer.*†
  • 27,813 women in the United States died from a gynecologic cancer.*†

*Incidence and death counts cover approximately 100% of the U.S. population.

†Source: U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2008 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report. Atlanta (GA): Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Cancer Institute; 2012. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/uscs.

CDC is promoting awareness of gynecologic cancer through its national gynecologic cancer awareness campaign, Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer.

What Is Gynecologic Cancer?

Gynecologic cancer is any cancer that starts in a woman’s reproductive organs. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts. Gynecologic cancers begin in different places within a woman’s pelvis, which is the area below the stomach and in between the hip bones.Diagram of the female genital tract depicting fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus, cervix, vagina, and vulva.

  • Cervical cancer begins in the cervix, which is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. (The uterus is also called the womb.)
  • Ovarian cancer begins in the ovaries, which are located on each side of the uterus.
  • Uterine cancer begins in the uterus, the pear-shaped organ in a woman’s pelvis where the baby grows when a woman is pregnant.
  • Vaginal cancer begins in the vagina, which is the hollow, tube-like channel between the bottom of the uterus and the outside of the body.
  • Vulvar cancer begins in the vulva, the outer part of the female genital organs.

Each gynecologic cancer is unique, with different signs and symptoms, different risk factors (things that may increase your chance of getting a disease), and different prevention strategies. All women are at risk for gynecologic cancers, and risk increases with age. When gynecologic cancers are found early, treatment is most effective.

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How to Contribute

If you or someone you know has been touched by ovarian cancer, you know the challenges that have to be faced. Our job, as an organization,

is to keep this cause front and center for women, the medical community, the scientific community and the legislators who appropriate funds to

support awareness, research and new diagnostics and treatments.

Your contribution will help support all of the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance’s advocacy, education, and awareness programs. Nearly half of our

funding comes from individual donors who share our goals in an effort to conquer ovarian cancer.

The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, as defined by the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible to

the fullest extent allowed by law. The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance’s Tax Identification Number is 31-1581756.

See“About Us” for more

information on our financial stewardship.

Please choose from the following topics:

Ready! September is

 

 

 

 

National Preparedness Month

Would you be ready if there were an emergency? Be prepared: assemble an emergency supply kit,

make your emergency plans, stay informed, and get involved in helping your family, your business,

and your community be ready for emergencies.

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You can join the effort by following four steps:

September 2010 marks the seventh annual National Preparedness Month, sponsored by the US Department of Homeland Security.

One goal of Homeland Security is to educate the public about how to prepare for emergencies, including natural disasters, mass casualties,

biological and chemical threats, radiation emergencies, and terrorist attacks.

During September, emergency preparedness will focus on:

Home and family preparedness, including pets, older Americans, and individuals with disabilities and special needs (Ready AmericaExternal Web Site Icon)
Back-to-school (Ready KidsExternal Web Site Icon)
Business preparedness (Ready BusinessExternal Web Site Icon)
Preparación en Español (Listo AmericaExternal Web Site Icon)

In collaboration with the American Red Cross, CDC’s Web site, Emergency Preparedness and You identifies and answers common questions about preparing for unexpected events, including:

Additional information and resources are available from Emergency Preparedness and Responseunder topics such as hurricane preparedness,

extreme heat, and bioterrorism. CDC continually updates information on recent outbreaks and incidents and lists emergency resources for

the general public as well as for clinicians and public health professionals.

Are you prepared? During September, focus on being ready – at home, at work, and in your community –

and prepare for a natural disaster or other emergency.

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Get an Emergency Kit

An emergency kit includes the basics for survival: fresh water, food, clean air, and warmth. You should have enough supplies

to survive for at least three days. Review the items recommended for a disaster supplies kit or

print the Homeland Security Emergency Supply checklist Adobe PDF file [PDF – 324 KB]External Web Site Icon.

Make an Emergency Plan

Make plans with your family and friends in case you’re not together during an emergency. Discuss how you’ll contact each other,

where you’ll meet, and what you’ll do in different situations. Read how to develop afamily disaster plan or fill out

the Homeland Security Family Emergency Plan {PDF – 521 KB] Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon.

You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water, and other supplies in sufficient quantity

to last for at least three days. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone immediately.

You could get help in hours, or it might take days. In addition, basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment, and telephones may

be cut off for days, or even a week or longer.

Recommended Items To Include In A Basic Emergency Supply Kit:

  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask, to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

Additional Items To Consider Adding To An Emergency Supply Kit:

  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Infant formula and diapers
  • Pet food and extra water for your pet
  • Cash or traveler’s checks and change
  • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container.
  • You can use the Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (EFFAK) – PDF, 277Kb) developed by Operation Hope,
  •  FEMA and Citizen Corps to help you organize your information.
  • Emergency reference material such as a first aid book or information from www.ready.gov.
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider additional bedding if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Complete change of clothing including a long sleeved shirt, long pants and sturdy shoes. Consider additional clothing if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper – When diluted nine parts water to one part bleach, bleach can be used as a disinfectant.
  •  Or in an emergency, you can use it to treat water by using 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water.
  •  Do not use scented, color safe or bleaches with added cleaners.
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items
  • Mess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils, paper towels
  • Paper and pencil
  • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children

Find out how to keep food safe during and after an emergency by visiting FoodSafety.gov.

Ask about planning at your workplace and your child’s school or daycare center. The US Department of EducationExternal Web Site Icon

gives guidelines for school preparedness. Workers at small, medium, and large businesses

should practice for emergencies of all kinds. See Ready BusinessExternal Web Site Icon for more information.

Be Informed

Being prepared means staying informed. Check all types of media – Web sites, newspapers, radio, TV, mobile and land phones –

for global, national and local information. During an emergency, your local Emergency Management or Emergency Services office

will give you information on such things as open shelters and evacuation orders. Check Ready AmericaExternal Web Site Iconcommunity and state information to learn

about resources in your community.


Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. They can appear suddenly without warning and can be invisible until dust and debris

are picked up or a funnel cloud appears. Planning and practicing specifically how and where you take shelter is a matter of survival.

Be prepared to act quickly. Keep in mind that while tornadoes are more common in the Midwest, Southeast and Southwest, they can

occur in any state and at any time of the year, making advance preparation is vitally important.Familiarize yourself with the terms

that are used to identify a tornado hazard.

  • tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area.
  • tornado warning is when a tornado is actually occurring, take shelter immediately.

Listen to Local Officials

Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government.

In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.

 

For further information on how to plan and prepare for tornadoes as well as what to do during and after a tornado, visit:

Federal Emergency Management Agency,NOAA Watch or American Red Cross.

for more information on Tornadoes click here>>


Emergency Preparedness for Pets

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Emergency Preparedness for the Senior Citizens

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Get InvolvedExternal Web Site Icon

Look into taking first aid and emergency response training, participating in community exercises, and volunteering to support local first responders.

Contact Citizens CorpsExternal Web Site Icon, which coordinates activities to make communities safer, stronger and better prepared to respond to an emergency situation.

Homeland Security promotes emergency preparedness throughout the year via the Ready America campaign.

Checklists, brochures, and videos are available in EnglishExternal Web Site Icon and in SpanishExternal Web Site Icon online and by phone (1-800-BE-READY and 1-888-SE-LISTO).

READ MORE>>


September Is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Cancer is a disease in which abnormal cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the prostate, it is called prostate cancer.

The prostate is a walnut-sized organ located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum in men. It produces fluid that makes up a part of semen.

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men, and second only to lung cancer in the number of cancer deaths.

In 2007 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), 223,307 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 29,093 men died from it.

* CDC provides men, doctors, and policymakers with the latest information about prostate cancer.

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How to Detect the Early Signs of Prostate Cancer

 

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PROSTATE CANCER SYSTEMS

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Screening for Prostate Cancer

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Symptoms

Different people have different symptoms for prostate cancer. Some men do not have symptoms at all.

Some symptoms of prostate cancer are—

  • Difficulty in starting urination.
  • Weak or interrupted flow of urine.
  • Frequent urination, especially at night.
  • Difficulty in emptying the bladder completely.
  • Pain or burning during urination.
  • Blood in the urine or semen.
  • Pain in the back, hips, or pelvis that doesn’t go away.
  • Painful ejaculation.

If you have any symptoms that worry you, be sure to see your doctor right away.

These symptoms may be caused by conditions other than prostate cancer.

Risk Factors

There is no way to know for sure if you will get prostate cancer. Men have a greater chance of getting prostate cancer if they are

50 years old or older, are African-American, or have a father, brother, or son who has had prostate cancer.

Screening for Prostate Cancer

Not all medical experts agree that screening for prostate cancer will save lives. Currently, there is not enough credible evidence to decide

if the potential benefit of prostate cancer screening outweighs the potential risks. The potential benefit of prostate cancer screening is early detection of cancer,

which may make treatment more effective. Potential risks include false positive test results (the test says you have cancer when you do not),

treatment of prostate cancers that may never affect your health, and mild to serious side effects from treatment of prostate cancer.

Graphic: Medical illustration showing the location of the prostate.

Most organizations recommend that men discuss with their doctors the benefits and risks of prostate cancer screening.

CDC supports informed decision making, which encourages men to talk with their doctors to learn the nature and risk of prostate cancer,

understand the benefits and risks of the screening tests, and make decisions consistent with their preferences and values.

Tests that are commonly used to screen for prostate cancer are—

  • Digital rectal exam (DRE): A doctor, nurse, or other health care professional places a gloved finger into the rectum to
  • feel the size, shape, and hardness of the prostate gland.
  • Prostate specific antigen test (PSA): PSA is a substance made by the prostate. The PSA test measures the level of PSA in the blood,
  •  which may be higher in men who have prostate cancer. However, other conditions such as an enlarged prostate, prostate infections,
  • and certain medical procedures also may increase PSA levels.

Is prostate cancer screening right for you? The decision is yours. To help men aged 50 years or older understand both sides of the issue,

CDC has developed several helpful guides to assist you with making an informed decision:

* Data source: U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2007 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report.

Atlanta (GA): Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

and National Cancer Institute; 2010. Available at:http://www.cdc.gov/uscs.

More Information

MAKE IT A SEPTEMBER TO REMEMBER!

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SEPTEMBER

2011

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ARCHIVE PAGES


SEPTEMBER IS…

Why We Remember?


It has been 10 years since the day that left America in complete devastation, despair and confusion.

The effects of that tragedy are still so real, the wounds are still so fresh,

but it is important to take time to remember and honor those that lost their lives and

take solace in the promises of God in times of tragedy. He will never leave nor forsake us.

He is faithful even in our darkest hours.

“IF GOD BE FOR US WHO CAN BE AGAINST US?”

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National Cholesterol Education Month

September is National Cholesterol Education Month, a good time to get your blood cholesterol checked and take steps to lower it if it is high.

National Cholesterol Education Month is also a good time to learn about lipid profiles and about food and lifestyle choices that help you reach personal cholesterol goals.

High blood cholesterol affects over 65 million Americans. It is a serious condition that increases your risk for heart disease. The higher your cholesterol level,

the greater the risk. You can have high cholesterol and not know it. Lowering cholesterol levels that are too high lessens your risk for developing heart disease

and reduces the chance of having a heart attack or dying of heart disease.

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The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

offers helpful resources

to use during National Cholesterol Education Month.

For Individuals

Get these public education booklets for yourself and

share them with family and friends.

For Persons with High Blood Cholesterol Who Need to Lower It

Heart Healthy Recipes

FOR MORE INFORMATION CLICK  BELOW:
 
 

September Is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

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September is TEAL

Thousands Wear TEAL Across the USA
September marks the nationwide observance of National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month.

The first Friday in September is National Wear TEAL Day, and the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance

will lead the efforts of thousands of Americans wearing TEAL to increase awareness about the deadly disease.

TEAL is the ovarian cancer community’s color and serves as a reminder that ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all the cancers

of the reproductive system and a leading cause of cancer death among women.

To find out what you can do this September to get involved, visit our September guide.

The United States of Teal campaign
United States of Teal is the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance’s campaign to raise awareness about ovarian cancer by gaining the support of state legislative leadership.

With our United States of Teal campaign we’re targeting all 50 state houses and asking legislators to pledge their allegiance to the fight against ovarian cancer. By signing a pledge card, they are letting their constituents know that they are committed to promoting ovarian cancer research, improving the lives of women suffering from ovarian cancer, and helping us raise awareness about ovarian cancer symptoms. Once a legislator pledges, we’ll turn his/her state teal on the United States of Teal web site (www.unitedstatesofteal.org). See the map below to see if your state has turned TEALyet!

To learn more about the campaign, visit www.unitedstatesofteal.org.

What’s New?
Our Shop+Give Program
Some of our favortite retailers have teamed up with the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance this September.

A portion of the proceeds of selected TEAL items from the following retailers will benefit the work of OCNA:

Macy’s, Chico’s, Ann Taylor Loft, PaperSource, RedEnvelope, DHC, Sketchers and Tom Shoes.

Click here to shop TEAL items from your favorite retailer! And Don’t forget to download the App for future online purchases.

Ovarian cancer is a growth of abnormal malignant cells that begins in the ovaries (women’s reproductive glands that produce ova).

Cancer that spreads to the ovaries but originates at another site is not considered ovarian cancer. 

Ovarian tumors can be benign (noncancerous)

or malignant (cancerous). Although abnormal, cells of benign tumors do not metastasize (spread to other parts of the body).

Malignant cancer cells in the ovaries can metastasize in two ways:  directly to other organs in the pelvis and abdomen (the more common way),

through the bloodstream or lymph nodes to other parts of the body.

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff

Living with cancer newsletter

Subscribe to our Living with cancernewsletter to stay up to date on cancer topics.

Symptoms of ovarian cancer are not specific to the disease, and they often

mimic those of many other more-common conditions,

including digestive and bladder problems.

When ovarian cancer symptoms are present, they tend to be persistent and worsen with time.

Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer may include:

  • Abdominal pressure, fullness, swelling or bloating
  • Pelvic discomfort or pain
  • Persistent indigestion, gas or nausea
  • Changes in bowel habits, such as constipation
  • Changes in bladder habits, including a frequent need to urinate
  • Loss of appetite or quickly feeling full
  • Increased abdominal girth or clothes fitting tighter around your waist
  • A persistent lack of energy
  • Low back pain

While the causes of ovarian cancer are unknown, some theories exist:

Genetic errors may occur because of damage from the normal monthly release of an egg.

Increased hormone levels before and during ovulation may stimulate the growth of abnormal cells.

 

 

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Types of Ovarian Cancer

Different types of ovarian cancer are classified according to the type of cell from which they start.

Epithelial tumors – About 90 percent of ovarian cancers develop in the epithelium, the thin layer of tissue that covers the ovaries.

This form of ovarian cancer generally occurs in postmenopausal women.

Germ cell carcinoma tumors –Making up about five percent of ovarian cancer cases, this type begins in the cells that form eggs.

While germ cell carcinoma can occur in women of any age, it tends to be found most often in women in their early 20s. Six main kinds of germ cell carcinoma exist,

but the three most common types are: teratomas, dysgerminomas, and endodermal sinus tumors. Many tumors that arise in the germ cells are benign.

Stromal carcinoma tumors – Ovarian stromal carcinoma accounts for about five percent of ovarian cancer cases. It develops in the connective

tissue cells that hold the ovary together and those that produce the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. The two most common types are

granulosa cell tumors and sertoli-leydig cell tumors. Unlike with epithelial ovarian carcinoma,

70 percent of stromal carcinoma cases are diagnosed in Stage I. READ MORE>>

 

Treatments and drugs

By Mayo Clinic staff

Living with cancer newsletter

Treatment of ovarian cancer usually involves a combination of surgery and chemotherapy.

Surgery
Treatment for ovarian cancer usually involves an extensive operation that includes removing both ovaries, fallopian tubes, and the uterus as

well as nearby lymph nodes and a fold of fatty abdominal tissue known as the omentum, where ovarian cancer often spreads. Your surgeon also removes

as much cancer as possible from your abdomen (surgical debulking).

Less extensive surgery may be possible if your ovarian cancer was diagnosed at a very early stage. For women with stage I ovarian cancer, surgery may involve

removing one ovary and its fallopian tube. This procedure may preserve the ability to have children in the future.

Chemotherapy
After surgery, you’ll most likely be treated with chemotherapy — drugs designed to kill any remaining cancer cells. Chemotherapy may also be

used as the initial treatment in some women with advanced ovarian cancer. Chemotherapy drugs can be administered in a vein (intravenously) or injected

directly into the abdominal cavity, or both methods of administering the drugs can be used. Chemotherapy drugs can be given alone or in combination..FOR MORE INFORMATION>>

 

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How to Contribute

If you or someone you know has been touched by ovarian cancer, you know the challenges that have to be faced. Our job, as an organization,

is to keep this cause front and center for women, the medical community, the scientific community and the legislators who appropriate funds to

support awareness, research and new diagnostics and treatments.

Your contribution will help support all of the Ovarian Cancer National Alliance’s advocacy, education, and awareness programs. Nearly half of our

funding comes from individual donors who share our goals in an effort to conquer ovarian cancer.

The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, as defined by the Internal Revenue Code. Donations are tax deductible to

the fullest extent allowed by law. The Ovarian Cancer National Alliance’s Tax Identification Number is 31-1581756.

See“About Us” for more

information on our financial stewardship.

Please choose from the following topics:

OVARIAN CANCER EXPLAINED…

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Ready! September is

 

 

 

 

National Preparedness Month

Would you be ready if there were an emergency? Be prepared: assemble an emergency supply kit,

make your emergency plans, stay informed, and get involved in helping your family, your business,

and your community be ready for emergencies.

Throughout September there will be activities across the country to promote emergency preparedness. More than 3,000 organizations – national, regional,

and local public and private organizations – are supporting emergency preparedness efforts and encouraging all Americans to take action.

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You can join the effort by following four steps:

September 2010 marks the seventh annual National Preparedness Month, sponsored by the US Department of Homeland Security.

One goal of Homeland Security is to educate the public about how to prepare for emergencies, including natural disasters, mass casualties,

biological and chemical threats, radiation emergencies, and terrorist attacks.

During September, emergency preparedness will focus on:

Home and family preparedness, including pets, older Americans, and individuals with disabilities and special needs (Ready AmericaExternal Web Site Icon)
Back-to-school (Ready KidsExternal Web Site Icon)
Business preparedness (Ready BusinessExternal Web Site Icon)
Preparación en Español (Listo AmericaExternal Web Site Icon)

In collaboration with the American Red Cross, CDC’s Web site, Emergency Preparedness and You identifies and answers common questions about preparing for unexpected events, including:

Additional information and resources are available from Emergency Preparedness and Responseunder topics such as hurricane preparedness,

extreme heat, and bioterrorism. CDC continually updates information on recent outbreaks and incidents and lists emergency resources for

the general public as well as for clinicians and public health professionals.

Are you prepared? During September, focus on being ready – at home, at work, and in your community –

and prepare for a natural disaster or other emergency.

Get an Emergency Kit

An emergency kit includes the basics for survival: fresh water, food, clean air, and warmth. You should have enough supplies

to survive for at least three days. Review the items recommended for a disaster supplies kit or

print the Homeland Security Emergency Supply checklist Adobe PDF file [PDF – 324 KB]External Web Site Icon.

Make an Emergency Plan

Make plans with your family and friends in case you’re not together during an emergency. Discuss how you’ll contact each other,

where you’ll meet, and what you’ll do in different situations. Read how to develop afamily disaster plan or fill out

the Homeland Security Family Emergency Plan {PDF – 521 KB] Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon.

You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water, and other supplies in sufficient quantity

to last for at least three days. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone immediately.

You could get help in hours, or it might take days. In addition, basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment, and telephones may

be cut off for days, or even a week or longer.

Recommended Items To Include In A Basic Emergency Supply Kit:

  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask, to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

Additional Items To Consider Adding To An Emergency Supply Kit:

  • Prescription medications and glasses
  • Infant formula and diapers
  • Pet food and extra water for your pet
  • Cash or traveler’s checks and change
  • Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container.
  • You can use the Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (EFFAK) – PDF, 277Kb) developed by Operation Hope,
  •  FEMA and Citizen Corps to help you organize your information.
  • Emergency reference material such as a first aid book or information from www.ready.gov.
  • Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider additional bedding if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Complete change of clothing including a long sleeved shirt, long pants and sturdy shoes. Consider additional clothing if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  • Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper – When diluted nine parts water to one part bleach, bleach can be used as a disinfectant.
  •  Or in an emergency, you can use it to treat water by using 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water.
  •  Do not use scented, color safe or bleaches with added cleaners.
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items
  • Mess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils, paper towels
  • Paper and pencil
  • Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children

Find out how to keep food safe during and after an emergency by visiting FoodSafety.gov.

Ask about planning at your workplace and your child’s school or daycare center. The US Department of EducationExternal Web Site Icon

gives guidelines for school preparedness. Workers at small, medium, and large businesses

should practice for emergencies of all kinds. See Ready BusinessExternal Web Site Icon for more information.

Be Informed

Being prepared means staying informed. Check all types of media – Web sites, newspapers, radio, TV, mobile and land phones –

for global, national and local information. During an emergency, your local Emergency Management or Emergency Services office

will give you information on such things as open shelters and evacuation orders. Check Ready AmericaExternal Web Site Iconcommunity and state information to learn

about resources in your community.


Tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms. They can appear suddenly without warning and can be invisible until dust and debris

are picked up or a funnel cloud appears. Planning and practicing specifically how and where you take shelter is a matter of survival.

Be prepared to act quickly. Keep in mind that while tornadoes are more common in the Midwest, Southeast and Southwest, they can

occur in any state and at any time of the year, making advance preparation is vitally important.Familiarize yourself with the terms

that are used to identify a tornado hazard.

  • tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area.
  • tornado warning is when a tornado is actually occurring, take shelter immediately.

Listen to Local Officials

Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government.

In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.

 

For further information on how to plan and prepare for tornadoes as well as what to do during and after a tornado, visit:

Federal Emergency Management Agency,NOAA Watch or American Red Cross.

for more information on Tornadoes click here>>


Emergency Preparedness for Pets

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Emergency Preparedness for the Senior Citizens

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Get InvolvedExternal Web Site Icon

Look into taking first aid and emergency response training, participating in community exercises, and volunteering to support local first responders.

Contact Citizens CorpsExternal Web Site Icon, which coordinates activities to make communities safer, stronger and better prepared to respond to an emergency situation.

Homeland Security promotes emergency preparedness throughout the year via the Ready America campaign.

Checklists, brochures, and videos are available in EnglishExternal Web Site Icon and in SpanishExternal Web Site Icon online and by phone (1-800-BE-READY and 1-888-SE-LISTO).

READ MORE>>


September Is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Cancer is a disease in which abnormal cells in the body grow out of control. When cancer starts in the prostate, it is called prostate cancer.

The prostate is a walnut-sized organ located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum in men. It produces fluid that makes up a part of semen.

Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men, and second only to lung cancer in the number of cancer deaths.

In 2007 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), 223,307 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and 29,093 men died from it.

* CDC provides men, doctors, and policymakers with the latest information about prostate cancer.

 

How to Detect the Early Signs of Prostate Cancer

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How to Understand Prostate Cancer

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The PSA Test – What you need to know

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Symptoms

Different people have different symptoms for prostate cancer. Some men do not have symptoms at all.

Some symptoms of prostate cancer are—

  • Difficulty in starting urination.
  • Weak or interrupted flow of urine.
  • Frequent urination, especially at night.
  • Difficulty in emptying the bladder completely.
  • Pain or burning during urination.
  • Blood in the urine or semen.
  • Pain in the back, hips, or pelvis that doesn’t go away.
  • Painful ejaculation.

If you have any symptoms that worry you, be sure to see your doctor right away.

These symptoms may be caused by conditions other than prostate cancer.

Risk Factors

There is no way to know for sure if you will get prostate cancer. Men have a greater chance of getting prostate cancer if they are

50 years old or older, are African-American, or have a father, brother, or son who has had prostate cancer.

Screening for Prostate Cancer

Not all medical experts agree that screening for prostate cancer will save lives. Currently, there is not enough credible evidence to decide

if the potential benefit of prostate cancer screening outweighs the potential risks. The potential benefit of prostate cancer screening is early detection of cancer,

which may make treatment more effective. Potential risks include false positive test results (the test says you have cancer when you do not),

treatment of prostate cancers that may never affect your health, and mild to serious side effects from treatment of prostate cancer.

Graphic: Medical illustration showing the location of the prostate.

Most organizations recommend that men discuss with their doctors the benefits and risks of prostate cancer screening.

CDC supports informed decision making, which encourages men to talk with their doctors to learn the nature and risk of prostate cancer,

understand the benefits and risks of the screening tests, and make decisions consistent with their preferences and values.

Tests that are commonly used to screen for prostate cancer are—

  • Digital rectal exam (DRE): A doctor, nurse, or other health care professional places a gloved finger into the rectum to
  • feel the size, shape, and hardness of the prostate gland.
  • Prostate specific antigen test (PSA): PSA is a substance made by the prostate. The PSA test measures the level of PSA in the blood,
  •  which may be higher in men who have prostate cancer. However, other conditions such as an enlarged prostate, prostate infections,
  • and certain medical procedures also may increase PSA levels.

Is prostate cancer screening right for you? The decision is yours. To help men aged 50 years or older understand both sides of the issue,

CDC has developed several helpful guides to assist you with making an informed decision:

* Data source: U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2007 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report.

Atlanta (GA): Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

and National Cancer Institute; 2010. Available at:http://www.cdc.gov/uscs.

More Information

MAKE IT A SEPTEMBER TO REMEMBER!