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WE’RE SORRY WE MISSED LYME DISEASE AWARENESS MONTH IN MAY,…

SO WE’RE ADDING IT IN OUR JUNE AWARENESS PAGE SINCE  

WE FEEL EVERYONE SHOULD BE AWARE OF THE COMPLICATION OF LYME DISEASE AND

HOW IMPORTANT IT IS TO NOT ONLY PRACTICE PREVENITIVE MEASURES TO AVOID THE DEER TICK,…

BUT ALSO HOW CRUCIAL IT IS FOR EARLY DETECTION!

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Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks.

Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans.

If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed

based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory

testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease

can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. Steps to prevent Lyme disease include using insect repellent,

removing ticks promptly, applying pesticides, and reducing tick habitat. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease

can occasionally transmit other tickborne diseases as well.

Lyme disease transmission

The Lyme disease bacterium, Borrelia burgdorferi, is spread through the bite of infected ticks.

The blacklegged tick (or deer tick, Ixodes scapularis) spreads the disease in the northeastern,

mid-Atlantic, and north-central United States, and the western blacklegged tick (Ixodes pacificus) spreads the disease on the Pacific Coast.

Ticks can attach to any part of the human body but are often found in hard-to-see areas such as the groin,

armpits, and scalp. In most cases, the tick must be attached for 36-48 hours or more before the Lyme disease bacterium can be transmitted.

Most humans are infected through the bites of immature ticks called nymphs.

Nymphs are tiny (less than 2 mm) and difficult to see; they feed during the spring and summer months.

Adult ticks can also transmit Lyme disease bacteria, but they are much larger and may be more likely to be discovered

and removed before they have had time to transmit the bacteria. Adult Ixodes ticks are most active during the cooler months of the year.

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Are there other ways to get Lyme disease?

  • There is no evidence that Lyme disease is transmitted from person-to-person. For example, a person cannot get infected from touching, kissing or having sex with a person who has Lyme disease.
  • Lyme disease acquired during pregnancy may lead to infection of the placenta and possible stillbirth; however, no negative effects on the fetus have been found when the mother receives appropriate antibiotic treatment. There are no reports of Lyme disease transmission from breast milk.
  • Although no cases of Lyme disease have been linked to blood transfusion, scientists have found that the Lyme disease bacteria can live in blood that is stored for donation. Individuals being treated for Lyme disease with an antibiotic should not donate blood. Individuals who have completed antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease may be considered as potential blood donors. Information on the current criteria for blood donation is available on the Red Cross website External Web Site Icon.
  • Although dogs and cats can get Lyme disease, there is no evidence that they spread the disease directly to their owners. However, pets can bring infected ticks into your home or yard. Consider protecting your pet, and possibly yourself, through the use of tick control products for animals.
  • You will not get Lyme disease from eating venison or squirrel meat, but in keeping with general food safety principles meat should always be cooked thoroughly. Note that hunting and dressing deer or squirrels may bring you into close contact with infected ticks.
  • There is no credible evidence that Lyme disease can be transmitted through air, food, water, or from the bites of mosquitoes, flies, fleas, or lice.
  • Ticks not known to transmit Lyme disease include Lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum), the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus).

Signs and Symptoms of Lyme Disease

If you had a tick bite, live in an area known for Lyme disease or
have recently traveled to an area where it occurs, and observe any of these symptoms, you should seek medical attention!

Early localized stage (3-30 days post-tick bite)

Red, expanding rash called erythema migrans (EM)

Fatigue, chills, fever, headache, muscle and joint aches, and swollen lymph nodes

Some people may get these general symptoms in addition to an EM rash,

but in others, these general symptoms may be the only evidence of infection.

Some people get a small bump or redness at the site of a tick bite that goes away in 1-2 days,

like a mosquito bite. This is not a sign that you have Lyme disease.

However, ticks can spread other organisms that may cause a different type of rash. For example,

Southern Tick-associated Rash Illness (STARI) causes a rash with a very similar appearance.

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Lyme Disease Diagnosis and Testing
Lyme disease is diagnosed based on:

Signs and symptoms

A history of possible exposure to infected blacklegged ticks

Laboratory blood tests are helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods.

Laboratory tests are not recommended for patients who do not have symptoms typical of Lyme disease.

Just as it is important to correctly diagnose Lyme disease when a patient has it,

it is important to avoid misdiagnosis and treatment of Lyme disease when the true cause of the illness is something else.

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Treatment

Patients treated with appropriate antibiotics in the early stages of Lyme disease usually recover rapidly and completely. Antibiotics commonly used for oral treatment include doxycycline, amoxicillin, or cefuroxime axetil. Patients with certain neurological or cardiac forms of illness may require intravenous treatment with drugs such as ceftriaxone or penicillin.

For detailed recommendations on treatment, consult the 2006 Guidelines for treatment developed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America.External Web Site Icon

Approximately 10-20% of patients (particularly those who were diagnosed later), following appropriate antibiotic treatment, may have persistent or recurrent symptoms and are considered to have Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has funded several studies on the treatment of Lyme disease which show that most patients recover when treated with a few weeks of antibiotics taken by mouth. For details on research into what is sometimes referred to as “chronic Lyme disease” and long-term treatment trials sponsored by NIH, visit the NIH Lyme Disease web site.External Web Site Icon

Additional information on prolonged treatment for Lyme disease is also available….click here

Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome

Approximately 10 to 20% of patients treated for Lyme disease with a recommended 2–4 week course of antibiotics will have lingering symptoms of fatigue, pain, or joint and muscle aches. In some cases, these can last for more than 6 months. Although often called “chronic Lyme disease,” this condition is properly known as “Post-treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome” (PTLDS).

The exact cause of PTLDS is not yet known. Most medical experts believe that the lingering symptoms are the result of residual damage to tissues and the immune system that occurred during the infection. Similar complications and “auto–immune” responses are known to occur following other infections, including Campylobacter (Guillain-Barre syndrome), Chlamydia (Reiter’s syndrome), and Strep throat (rheumatic heart disease). In contrast, some health care providers tell patients that these symptoms reflect persistent infection with Borrelia burgdorferi. Recent animal studies have given rise to questions that require further research, and clinical studies to determine the cause of PTLDS in humans are ongoing.

Regardless of the cause of PTLDS, studies have not shown that patients who received prolonged courses of antibiotics do better in the long run than patients treated with placebo. Furthermore, long-term antibiotic treatment for Lyme disease has been associated with serious complicationsExternal Web Site Icon. The good news is that patients with PTLDS almost always get better with time; the bad news is that it can take months to feel completely well.

If you have been treated for Lyme disease and still feel unwell, see your doctor to discuss how to relieve your suffering. Your doctor may want to treat you in ways similar to patients who have fibromyalgia or chronic fatigue syndrome. This does not mean that your doctor is dismissing your pain or saying that you have these conditions. It simply means that the doctor is trying to help you cope with your symptoms using the best tools available.

It is normal to feel overwhelmed by your ongoing symptoms. Some things that may help you manage your PTLDS include:

Check with your doctor to make sure that Lyme disease is not the only thing affecting your health.
Become well-informed. There is a lot of inaccurate information available, especially on the internet. Learn how to sort through this maze.
Track your symptoms. It can be helpful to keep a diary of your symptoms, sleep patterns, diet, and exercise to see how these influence your well-being.
Maintain a healthy diet and get plenty of rest.
Share your feelings. If your family and friends can’t provide the support you need, talk with a counselor who can help you find ways of managing your life during this difficult time. As with any illness, Lyme disease can affect you and your loved ones. It doesn’t mean that your symptoms are not real. It means that you are a human being who needs extra support in a time of need.

Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS).

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In 2011, there were an estimated 86,100 home and community-related unintentional injury deaths,

accounting for 70 percent of all unintentional injury deaths that year. An additional

28.5 million people suffered nonfatal medically consulted injuries due to home and

community-related incidents, which correlates to about one out of every 11 people.

Families need to be aware of the dangers related to homes and recreation and

take the proper safety precautions to prevent unintentional injuries and deaths.

Drowning Falls Poisoning Burns Choking In the Home Fire Sports Unintentional Overdoses

Drowning

Drowning in homes resulted in 1,000 deaths in 2011.

Keep adults and children safe in swimming pools and bathtubs

by learning about water safety and the necessary precautions your family should take.

Falls

Falls account for 8.9 million annual trips to emergency rooms in the United States

and are especially dangerous for older adults. Learn how to prevent slips, trips and

falls in your home and how to protect the older adults in your life from this easily preventable danger.

Poisoning

Poisoning is responsible for more than half of all home-related

unintentional injury deaths and includes deaths from drugs, medicines,

other sold and liquid substances and gases and vapors. Young children

are especially at risk for poisoning related eating or swallowing over-the-counter

and prescription medicines found in the home. Carbon monoxide, radon and

lead poisoning are several of the leading causes of environmental exposures

that are extremely dangerous to your family’s health.

Burns

The most common causes of burns are from scalds (steam, hot bath water, hot drinks and foods), fire, chemicals,

electricity and overexposure to the sun. Some burns may be more serious than others, but many are treatable.

Choking

Choking and suffocation is the third leading cause of home and community

death in the United States, and children and older adults are particularly

vulnerable to choking hazards. Foods are responsible for most choking

incidents and can cause a simple coughing fit or something more

serious like a complete block in the airway, which can lead to death.

In the Home

Every room in your home presents different hazards that can easily be fixed,

whether it’s learning about knife and kitchen safety or preventing slips, trips

and falls in the bathroom. Learn how to make your entire home safer,

including your kitchen, bathroom, bedroom and the outside.

Fire

Although deaths and injuries from residential fires have decreased

in the past several years, deaths from fires and burns are still the fifth leading

cause of fatal home injuries. Seventy percent of these deaths are from inhaling smoke.

Learn about fire hazards and prevention and what to do if a fire occurs in your home.

Unintentional Overdoses

Unintentional overdoses include deaths from prescription narcotics,

 illegal drugs and alcohol. Recently, emergency room visits

for nonmedical use of prescription and over-the-counter

drugs have caught up with those for illegal drugs,

each accounting for 1 million emergency room visits in 2008.

Sports

Sports and exercise are good for you but often result in unintentional

injury from accidents, poor training practices and improper gear.

Sports-related traumatic brain injuries also have been on the rise

and can range from “mild” (a brief change in mental status or consciousness)

or “severe” (an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia after the injury).

 

 

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 *****

 

 

CELEBRATE THE GREAT OUTDOORS!

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You may love the outdoors, but everyone has those friends or family members that just prefer to lounge

in front of the TV or who may be a little bit squeamish about bugs, baiting hooks, mud and dirt or heights.

Of course you love them anyway—

but what better time to give them that little nudge to join you for some fresh air than Great Outdoors Month?

President Obama—along with almost every state governor—proclaimed June as “Great Outdoors Month,”

urging Americans to uphold our legacy of conserving lands for future generations. Whether it’s hiking, canoeing,

fishing, swimming, bird watching—or just having a picnic and enjoying nature—

getting outside with your loved ones in our shared resources is the perfect way to celebrate.

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THE 10 BEST NATIONAL PARK ADVENTURES WITH KIDS

Doctors Prescribing Time Outside

 Tips for Staying Active With Kids and Family

If you’ve got kids, of course you want to make sure they grow up fit and healthy.

But you also know it’s hard to juggle work, family, and physical activity.

Still, setting a healthy example is a good start.

So if you’re looking for ways to get your kids involved, check out these tips.

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 Plan outdoor activities

Set aside one day a weekend to do something active as a family: swimming in the summer,

sledding or hiking in the winter, or biking in the spring and fall. Taking along a picnic lunch—

and splurging on some healthy snacks after a good workout—will help the day go by without a complaint.

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  Take classes together
Ask around at fitness clubs and community centers in your area about yoga or

aerobics classes offered to parents and kids together. If your little one is too young

to participate, look for classes that help you burn calories with your baby by incorporating

them into your yoga moves or pushing them along during stroller workouts.

No kids? Check out partner yoga or even doga—yup, yoga for you and your dog.

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  Redo your family room

Too often, family rooms are the center of laziness in a home: a comfy couch,

a video-game console, a shelf full of DVDs,

and nothing to encourage fitness or physical activity. There are ways to add in subtle reminders, however,

without overhauling your entire room or dragging in a giant piece of workout equipment.

Set a time limit on weekly television viewing and incorporate

these Skinny House essentials to keep your whole family moving.

Indoor sports: Pick your passion
As for sports, hockey is the ruling sport in our house, and my 4-year-old is completely obsessed.

On any given day, we can be found playing hockey indoors on the hardwood floors.

All it takes are kid-sized sticks, soft pucks or balls and socks for sliding around on the floors.

Goal nets are a bonus, and we’ve used anything from a kitchen chair to a plastic bin — creativity is key!

Kids are flexible — literally
Additional indoor activities that get a huge thumbs-up from the kids are workout videos, yoga or Pilates.

My kids enjoy lifting their pretend weights made out of toys,

and they also enjoy doing pseudo-planks or jumping jacks right alongside me.

Sure, you may end up with a toddler sitting on your abs as you try to do crunches,

but hey — the extra resistance training can be great for your core!

 

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10 Top Ways to Stay Active as a Family

Going to the gym is fine for adults, but when kids are involved you’ve got to get more creative… and more fun!

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1. Go on a Scavenger Hunt

Make a list of challenges (find an orange leaf, get a neighbor’s signature,

snap a photo of a playground, etc.), split your family into teams, set a time limit and then head off

(on foot or on bike) to see who can complete the most items.

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2. Have a Water Day

Tossing water balloons, splashing in a kiddie pool and

running through a sprinkler in the backyard are fun ways to stay cool and active on a hot summer day.

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3. Set ‘Mileage’ Goals for the Weekend

Decide as a family how many steps, or how many miles, you want to travel over the weekend,

then have fun trying to reach the goal. You can use pedometers to measure steps

taken while running errands, going on hikes, playing tag and more,

and can challenge the family to increase your goal each weekend.

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4. Wash the Car

Washing the car uses key core muscles and can be a fun, bonding experience,

especially if you take time to cool off with the hose, too.

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5. Family Olympics

Get together with a group of families and compete in events like hula-hoops,

50-yard dash, relay race, basketball shoot, and an obstacle course.

You can even make it an annual event!

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6. Family Fitness Classes

If you like a more structured routine,

try a fitness class designed for families, like stroller workouts, mom/dad

and baby workouts or family yoga.

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7. Do Chores Together

Vacuuming, washing windows, weeding the garden,

raking leaves and even doing laundry work your muscles and burn calories

while teaching your kids the value of responsibility.

Make chores fun by setting a time limit and

turning up the music while you work together as a family.

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8. Plan Seasonal Outdoor Activities

Swimming, biking, canoeing and hiking are great in the summer,

while sledding, ice skating, building a snowman or skiing are fun –

and great for your fitness goals – in the winter.

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9. Play Together

Tag, hide-and-go-seek, hop scotch, doing cartwheels

and dancing in the kitchen are so much fun you won’t even realize it’s exercise in disguise.

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10. Try Out Family Sports

A backyard game of softball or volleyball,

shooting hoops or taking a trip to a golf course

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You Can Even Stay Active on Your Family Vacation!

Whether you’re going to grandma’s house for the weekend, planning a trip abroad or even having a “staycation,” family getaways are another opportunity to fit in fun activities that promote fitness. While on vacation, try:

give you quality time as a family while staying active.

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Send us your tips for a safe and sensational summer!

HAVE A GREAT SUMMER!

Don’t forget to leave your comments!

We look forward to hearing from you!
AND DON’T FORGET TO PASS IT ON!

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